Welcome

Hi, welcome to the horsetrainingsolutions blog. I’ll be blogging about things that crop up during my work with either my own horses or those of clients. Also, every now and again I’ll invite guest horse trainers to write about something relevant to your comments.

And that’s where you come in. Please use the contact box on the contact page or use the comment box on the blog itself to send me your questions about horse training. You can also write in about any problems you might be having with your horse.

Either I or one of the resident expert trainers will do our best to answer your questions.

This will also automatically sign you up for occasional newsletters and any product updates or training updates I make on the website.

Members will also have special members-only access to some training information on the website – audio interviews, videos and other downloads not otherwise available for non-members.

On the website itself you’ll be introduced to horsetrainers who really do care about you getting the best out of yourself and your horse.

There will be an increasing selection of downloads, audios, videos and e-books available.

Every now and again you will have the chance to win a DVD or book that I recommend.

So, please start sending in your questions or problems you might be having with your horse.

I’m looking forward to hearing from you.

Elizabeth


 

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4 Antworten auf Welcome

  1. The problem I am having with my new horse,( I’ve had him for just 2 months) & he’s an 8yr old Irish Sport Horse, 16hh. Is that he is frightened of Bullocks or Cows. We came accross a small herd on the Bridlepath out on the Moors & his heart was thumping against my leg, when I turned him away from them he tried to bolt with me.However, I managed to control him, and my husband who came with me on foot, led him with me still on board, back through the gate & onto the road, where we managed to calm him a little. What would you advise? Regards, Estelle

    • Elizabeth sagt:

      Hi Estelle, welcome to horsetrainingsolutions. Thank you for your comment. You will receive a more detailed reply from me per e-mail.

      For a short term answer, it sounds to me as if you and your horse would benefit from investing some time into completing a good, comprehensive groundwork course. Maybe you can find a trainer near you who could help you? (If you send me an e-mail with your location I might be able to recommend someone). Especially as you have had the horse for such a short period of time. I always get to know my horses from the ground upwards. This establishes personal space boundaries and is a good way of building confidence for both you and your horse.

      A good ground-work course would also help you learn to understand why your horse needs you to be a good leader for him in your herd of two and why your horse needs to be able to look to you for leadership, not necessarily you calming him down. Calming him down in certain situations could be interpreted by him as you rewarding the wrong behaviour. e.g. if you are stroking and patting him and saying “good boy” when he is in a highly nervous state you are “rewarding” the “wrong” behaviour.

      I would also learn how to implement a one-rein-stop on your horse, and learn the psychology behind why it works when done properly. Again, this is something a good ground-work course could teach you. If you learn to do it properly with your horse and practice it regularly, it will give you the confidence to know you can cope with just about any situation you and your horse might find yourselves in. That confidence will transmit to the horse and he will become more relaxed because of it.

      A basic introduction to the one-rein-stop can be found here: http://www.thinkinghorse.org/sample-exercises/the-one-rein-stop

      The one-rein-stop is a useful tool or training aid, but as with all these things it has to be practised and practised properly. *

      On Kate Farmer’s Thinking Horse DVD you will find a comprehensive list of horsetraining exercises from the ground. This should complement but not replace any one-on-one work you might do with a trainer.

      If you would like to send me a short video of you handling your horse from the ground and some ridden work I would be happy to look at it for you and maybe give you some more practical pointers.

      *The exercises, especially the one-rein-stop are not to be carried out if the horse is wearing any kind of artificial aid e.g. martingales, side reins, draw reins etc.

  2. The problem I am having with my new horse,( I’ve had him for just 2 months) & he’s an 8yr old Irish Sport Horse, 16hh. Is that he is frightened of Bullocks or Cows. We came accross a small herd on the Bridlepath out on the Moors & his heart was thumping against my leg, when I turned him away from them he tried to bolt with me.However, I managed to control him, and my husband who came with me on foot, led him with me still on board, back through the gate & onto the road, where we managed to calm him a little. What would you advise? Regards, Estelle

    • Elizabeth sagt:

      Hi Estelle, welcome to horsetrainingsolutions. Thank you for your comment. You will receive a more detailed reply from me per e-mail.

      For a short term answer, it sounds to me as if you and your horse would benefit from investing some time into completing a good, comprehensive groundwork course. Maybe you can find a trainer near you who could help you? (If you send me an e-mail with your location I might be able to recommend someone). Especially as you have had the horse for such a short period of time. I always get to know my horses from the ground upwards. This establishes personal space boundaries and is a good way of building confidence for both you and your horse.

      A good ground-work course would also help you learn to understand why your horse needs you to be a good leader for him in your herd of two and why your horse needs to be able to look to you for leadership, not necessarily you calming him down. Calming him down in certain situations could be interpreted by him as you rewarding the wrong behaviour. e.g. if you are stroking and patting him and saying “good boy” when he is in a highly nervous state you are “rewarding” the “wrong” behaviour.

      I would also learn how to implement a one-rein-stop on your horse, and learn the psychology behind why it works when done properly. Again, this is something a good ground-work course could teach you. If you learn to do it properly with your horse and practice it regularly, it will give you the confidence to know you can cope with just about any situation you and your horse might find yourselves in. That confidence will transmit to the horse and he will become more relaxed because of it.

      A basic introduction to the one-rein-stop can be found here: http://www.thinkinghorse.org/sample-exercises/the-one-rein-stop

      The one-rein-stop is a useful tool or training aid, but as with all these things it has to be practised and practised properly. *

      On Kate Farmer’s Thinking Horse DVD you will find a comprehensive list of horsetraining exercises from the ground. This should complement but not replace any one-on-one work you might do with a trainer.

      If you would like to send me a short video of you handling your horse from the ground and some ridden work I would be happy to look at it for you and maybe give you some more practical pointers.

      *The exercises, especially the one-rein-stop are not to be carried out if the horse is wearing any kind of artificial aid e.g. martingales, side reins, draw reins etc.

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