Vaquero, Buckaroo or Spanish Riding School?

How Natural Horsemanship developed – a brief history of natural horsemanship.

Bill Dorrance is almost universally acknowledged as being the father of modern-day natural horsemanship as we know it, along with his brother Tom Dorrance and then Ray Hunt. (More about them and their Legacy of Legends can be found here on Facebook.)

For me, horsemanship means not just knowing how to ride, but includes learning about the horse’s physiology, psychology, herd instincts, and how horses process information.

In classical riding, the foremost concern is with acquiring a balanced, deep and feeling seat or core as Jane Savoie calls it. The seat in this context refers to the seat bones, pubic arch, thighs, lower back and importantly, the abdominal muscles. Classical riders develop light, responsive horses because they ride from their core. The horse is ridden firstly from the seat, then the legs and into the hands.

“The hands receive what the leg puts into them – no more, no less” - Dr Thomas Ritter.

These definitions of classical riding and horsemanship are pretty much the reason for being for horsetrainingsolutions. It is why we are here, doing what we are doing. This is what we are trying to promote here on the blog and website.

The big question is: Are the two related and just how did all this “natural” stuff start to begin with?

To answer that, I found this lovely little video. So, put on the kettle, pull up your chair and find out a little more about The Vaquero! The film is about 20 min long.

The Vaquero.

What do you think? I’d love to hear any comments you might have about the film. Use the comment box below.

I found the film via a link at The Horse Show with Rick Lamb.

See also: What is Natural Horsemanship?

Always wear appropriate safety items of clothing, gloves, shoes and head protection when handling or riding your horse. There is always some risk involved in horse training for both you and the horse. Be sensible and stay within your level of training. This information illustrates the training methods and techniques I and my colleagues use. It is your responsibility to use it wisely. It is not intended to replace personal instruction from a professional instructor. Keep yourself and your horse out of trouble. if you wish to learn more about these methods contact us at: elizabeth@horsetrainingsolutions.com www.horsetrainingsolutions.com

Members area coming soon!

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16 Antworten auf Vaquero, Buckaroo or Spanish Riding School?

  1. Petra Studeny sagt:

    Thank you for posting this video!

    To me the most noticeable was that, “It would take anywhere from 7 – 10 years to train those horses. And they wouldn’t even start the horses until they were 4, and really get into training when they were 5 or 6.”

    And – “IT TAKES AS LONG AS IT TAKES.”

    It really puts things into perspective.

    • Elizabeth sagt:

      Hi Petra, welcome to horsetrainingsolutions. Thank you for your comment. It’s interesting isn’t it? As I’m starting and working with Elektra, our 3 yr. old freiburger filly who is to become my daughter’s riding horse for all occasions, I am becoming more and more aware of the time span needed. As you say it puts it into perspective. I watched Pat Parelli being interviewed recently and in the interview he defined horsemanship as being “the skills and the habits that both humans and horses need to become partners”. And that is the perspective I am acquiring.

  2. Petra Studeny sagt:

    Thank you for posting this video!

    To me the most noticeable was that, “It would take anywhere from 7 – 10 years to train those horses. And they wouldn’t even start the horses until they were 4, and really get into training when they were 5 or 6.”

    And – “IT TAKES AS LONG AS IT TAKES.”

    It really puts things into perspective.

    • Elizabeth sagt:

      Hi Petra, welcome to horsetrainingsolutions. Thank you for your comment. It’s interesting isn’t it? As I’m starting and working with Elektra, our 3 yr. old freiburger filly who is to become my daughter’s riding horse for all occasions, I am becoming more and more aware of the time span needed. As you say it puts it into perspective. I watched Pat Parelli being interviewed recently and in the interview he defined horsemanship as being “the skills and the habits that both humans and horses need to become partners”. And that is the perspective I am acquiring.

  3. As a California horsewoman, learning the vaquero way of riding and training horses, as well as earning a Bronze Medal Rider Award from the U.S. Dressage Federation, has led me to understand how the traditional training methods like they use at the Spanish Riding School influenced the California vaquero’s way of training horses. Thanks for sharing “The Vaquero.” Loved it.

  4. As a California horsewoman, learning the vaquero way of riding and training horses, as well as earning a Bronze Medal Rider Award from the U.S. Dressage Federation, has led me to understand how the traditional training methods like they use at the Spanish Riding School influenced the California vaquero’s way of training horses. Thanks for sharing “The Vaquero.” Loved it.

  5. Hi Elizabeth,
    I’m happy to announce that just in time for Christmas, “Spurs for Jose” is now available at http://www.whimsicalpublications.com and Amazon. com.
    Happy reading!

  6. Hi Elizabeth,
    I’m happy to announce that just in time for Christmas, “Spurs for Jose” is now available at http://www.whimsicalpublications.com and Amazon. com.
    Happy reading!

  7. Elizabeth sagt:

    Thanks Wanda, that’s great news!

  8. Elizabeth sagt:

    Thanks Wanda, that’s great news!

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